Posted in Flowers

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There weren’t many flowers at the National Rhododendron Garden on the weekend, but I did manage to stumble across this one, hidden in the shrubbery. If you know what it is, can you please let me know in the comments? Thanks 🙂

Posted in Flowers, Learning

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It seems ages since I’ve posted a photo … in fact, it’s been over a week. This was a flower I captured a few weekends ago, in the Castlemaine Botanic Garden. Do you know what kind of flower it is? If you know, could you write the name of the flower in the comments please?

My absence from blogging has been due to the amount of marking I’ve had to do over the past week or so. For those of you who don’t know, I’m a university lecturer and this semester, in addition to my new full-time job (which I started two weeks ago), I’m teaching a unit at a different university on facilitating engaging learning experiences.

I’ve come to recognise that my approach to marking is a dialogic one. I tend to comment on students’ ideas, or I ask questions of them, or I put forward an alternative perspective. I seek to affirm, yet challenge and extend students’ thinking, and that’s challenging because I also have to be nice – and that’s one of the things I find most difficult to be. One consequence of this approach is that marking takes ages! Markers are allocated about 20 minutes per paper for marking, but I often take an hour per paper – even longer when the ideas are trapped inside somewhat clumsy expression.

So that’s what’s been taking lots of my time and attention. Up at 6 most mornings, mark a paper or two before the hour-long commute to work, work, hour-long commute home, more marking. It’s an intellectually draining process and I find that I don’t have much headspace for other things. Getting my head around a new workplace, new colleagues, new relationships, new places and ways of storing information, new processes, new location, is difficult enough when that’s all that’s going on in your life. Marking on top of that means my head is well and truly full.

Except, that I have to keep some space free because my youngest daughter is getting married! In 13 days’ time. In Tasmania. There are so many decisions to be made, so many details to organise, so many conversations to have, so many others to consult … not being in Tasmania is making the whole thing a tad more difficult, but we’re on the phone to each other a few times a day, and sometimes late into the night, and that helps in terms of decision-making and keeping each other informed of what’s happening.

There’s a lot going on!

Posted in Flowers, Learning

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Robbing the flower of all its colour doesn’t rob it of its beauty – it just allows us to see differently. There’s a lesson in there I’m sure.

Posted in Flowers

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Getting close up to flowers with my macro lens can be dangerous, particularly when there are bees around, but I managed to avoid the bees on this rose. The depth of colour in the centre and the delicacy of the outer petals initially drew my attention. And then I noticed the water droplets from the recent rain. So much beauty in one single flower.

This was taken at the Castlemaine Botanic Gardens where the roses were so tall I couldn’t reach most of them.

Posted in Flowers, Nature

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Today was my second day at my new job (yesterday being ANZAC Day) and apparently I have to go back again tomorrow!

I have a flower sitting on my kitchen window sill, waiting for me to shoot it. Hopefully I’ll get to it before it starts to fade – although there’s a certain beauty in a faded flower.

In the meantime, I’ll content myself with a flower I shot on the weekend at the Castlemaine Botanic Garden.

Posted in Flowers, Life

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It was my first day at my new (full-time, ongoing, academic) job today. A barrage of information that lasted all morning … then ‘getting settled’ during the afternoon – which meant finding more information, this time on my own.

New jobs are exhausting! Ten hours of newness in one day is quite enough. It’s time for a cuppa … and some flowers, of course!