Posted in Life, Photography, Travel

316

In Sydney’s Hyde Park, Haruki skates in a swarm of controversy.

I asked Haruki (I admit to not knowing his name at this point) to do a jump so I could shoot him in the light bouncing off the War Memorial. An elderly couple (read: older than me) roundly castigated us both – Haruki for skating and ‘potentially killing a small child’, me for ‘encouraging him, particularly as I was old enough to know better’. It was a moment of instant bonding with my new friend Haruki.

Posted in Photography, Travel

313

There was a man in Sydney’s Hyde Park, playing an instrument that makes the fountain work.

Well, that’s what I like to think anyway.

Posted in Life, Photography, Travel

309

Staying with the Sydney theme for another day … although, really, this image could have come from anywhere. All over the world people rage against injustice, and express their rage in different ways. And some photograph the man who covers himself in a sign, while others photograph the photographer.

What this image doesn’t show is busker Joe Moore, playing in the Pitt St mall … the music this man was joyfully dancing to. The dancing man signifies balance to me – the injustice he’s railing against hasn’t dampened his spirit – he can still dance with enthusiastic abandon while sending passers-by a message.

Posted in Life, Photography, Travel

307

In Sydney’s Blythe St, a hoarding around a building invites me into another world.

I like Sydney.
I like the parks in the centre of the city, and the gardens at the edges.
I like the expanse of the harbour, and the ferries dotted across it.
I like the iconic buildings and structures, and the mix of old and new – sandstone rubbing shoulders with and being dwarfed by glass and steel.
I like the spaces to sit and eat lunch outside with colleagues or on your own, the breadth of Martin Place.
And I like that Martin Place always brings to mind Les Murray’s An absolutely ordinary rainbow.
It too invites me into another world.

Posted in Life, Travel

294

Antony, from Paris, decided, at the age of 20, to travel the world. He’s now 23 and has been to 40 countries. When I asked his favourite, he listed about ten in quick succession.

Wherever he goes, Antony lays his map out, with photos of his travels around the edge, and waits for people to be curious enough to talk to him. There’s a cap for donations – to help support his journey – and it seems that that’s how he gets by. A crowd-funding scheme that’s quite low-tech. But what an adventure!