Posted in Flowers, Learning

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I think I’ve picked the wrong time of year, but I’m going to return to flower photography for a while. I’ve concentrated on portraits for the last little while – although I haven’t featured many on this blog – but now I want to return to flowers.

I love photographing flowers – there are so many colours, so many shapes, so many sizes, so many types. An endless array – and we celebrate that. We cultivate variety, we actively plan for it in our parks and gardens if we are of a gardening bent, and if we aren’t we wander through the park or garden enjoying the variety, looking out for that one different flower. We are amazed at the size of some flowers. We take photos, paint them, adorn our homes with them. We buy them and give them as a token of our love or a symbol of our sorrow, or our appreciation.

There’s no pressure for flowers to be a particular way – they can have whirly bits, and squiggly bits, and movement-y bits; they can be white or yellow or pink or mauve or any colour they happen to be – and they’re all beautiful.

Wouldn’t it be good if we thought of ourselves and each other like that? If we celebrated our whirly bits and squiggly bits and movement-y bits? If we celebrated the variety of colours and shapes and sizes. If we were amazed by each other? How much kinder might we be if we looked at others and celebrated them the way we do with flowers?

Here’s today’s dahlia. Who is your dahlia?

Posted in Festival, Flowers

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We went to Bendigo today – just because we could – and happened upon a huge Easter festival … markets, food trucks, rides for the kids, buskers, loads of vintage cars, and bus loads of people. We obviously hadn’t received the memo because we didn’t have our chairs – the streets were lined with people sitting on camp chairs or blankets, baskets of food and drink at their feet. It turned out they were waiting for the parade.

It was worth the wait! It lasted an hour and a half and finished with the longest Chinese dragon in the state (country/southern hemisphere).

Because we didn’t have chairs, we wandered around town and came across a conservatory … and in the conservatory were dahlias! (If you saw yesterday’s post, you’ll know why I was excited!). So, much sooner than I expected – here’s a close up of a dahlia!

Posted in Flowers, Photography

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I’m away from home this week and so drawing from my archive. This is a flower I shot in the studio last year … I like the way the light seems to come from the inside of the flower.

Posted in Flowers, Photography

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I feel it’s time for a flower. This flower is actually pink, but playing around in post-processing I was able to give it a very different look.

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Posted in Life, Melbourne

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A trip to the Dandenong Ranges has become a regular part of our life here in Melbourne. When the city starts to feel like it’s closing in, we head for the hills. Literally. Being amongst the trees brings an immediate feeling of peace. One of the gardens we visit when we’re in the area is the Alfred Nicholas Gardens.

At the bottom of the garden (and the bottom of a hill) is a lake. On the lake is an island. Linking the island and the shore are a series of bridges. On this bridge is my husband Tim. In the distance is another man, a stranger, who told Tim as he walked past that he had good taste in shirts.

I thought the symmetry was pretty neat.

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